Douglas Lake: Fish, swim, boat only a few miles from Gatlinburg TN

Douglas Lake in TN

Douglas Lake is located just a few miles from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (photo by HBW/shutterstock.com)

Category:
7 Comments

Disclosure: This site is sponsored by ads and affiliate programs. We may earn money from the companies mentioned in this post. As an Amazon, Tripster and CJ Affiliate we may earn from qualifying purchases.

East Tennessee didn’t always look like it does today. 

The rivers ran wild and free, carving through the bedrock of time. 

They were life-giving as people used their waters for irrigation, sustenance and commerce. 

But they were also capricious, swollen with heavy spring rains. The people who lived in the valleys and low-lying areas often found themselves endangered in the shadow of the very waters that soothed and comforted them the rest of the year. 

Then came the Tennessee Valley Authority. Possibly the most successful of FDR’s agencies, it changed the face of the nation with mighty infrastructure projects and protected people from the fury of flood waters.

They dammed the rivers, relocated entire communities and, for the most part, tamed the deadly floods.  

Now, the lakes of East Tennessee are among the area’s lesser known jewels, offering boating, fishing, skiing, swimming and more. 

In Sevier County, the lake of choice is Douglas Lake, located just a few miles from Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg

Work began to dam the French Broad River in East Tennessee in February of 1942 and almost a year to the day later, the job was done. It was a world record time for projects of an equivalent size, according to the TVA.  

The Douglas dam features four generating units that together have a net dependable capacity of 111 megawatts. I have no idea what that means, but it sounds quite impressive. 

The reservoir itself extends 43 miles upriver from the dam through Sevier, Jefferson and Cocke counties.

What can you do at Douglas Lake?

Technically a reservoir, it’s chiefly called Douglas Lake by locals. It’s great for picnicking, camping, boating and fishing. 

It’s also a popular destination for birders. Birdwatchers enjoy the fall migration of shore birds, wading birds and other waterfowl from late July to early October.

The migrating birds feed on the muddy shoreline and shallow water as the level of the reservoir is lowered to winter pool levels, which in normal years is about 44 feet lower than optimum summer pool.

Read Also: Where to see wildlife in the Smoky Mountains 

Also of interest if you’re into birding is the nearby Seven Island State Park, located in a fork in the French Broad, just below Douglas Lake at the Knox/Sevier County line.

According to the park’s website, songbirds, hawks, and waterfowl can be seen along the meadow trails and several old barns are a favorite refuge for barn owls.

For paddlers and anglers, there is a small canoe/kayak launch that provides access to the French Broad River.

Douglas Reservoir provides 513 miles of shoreline and about 28,420 acres of water surface for recreation activities which includes skiers, wakeboarders and jet-skiers in addition to fishing and swimming. 

Bluegill (pictured above), catfish, crappie and black bass are some of the fish you will find in Douglas Lake (stock photo)

What kind of fish are in Douglas Lake?

The reservoir, which occasionally hosts large fishing tournaments, offers black bass as well as large and smallmouth as well as crappie.

Other frequently caught fish include bluegill, catfish, walleye and its close relative sauger. 

If you are going to fish the lake, you should be aware of the requirements. Anyone 13 years or older is required to have a Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency issued license.

There are some exemptions, but most of them will not be applicable to anyone who does not own lakeside farmland or live on lakefront property. 

One exemption that applies is for military members on leave. They must have a copy of their leave orders (not a pass) to qualify. 

Also, it should be noted that anyone over the age of 13 who is assisting a child to fish should also have a license, available online at the TWRA official website. They can be purchased before you make your trip. 

There are a wide variety of licenses at varying costs for residents and non-residents. For non-residents, prices range from $11 to $99 for an annual pass. 

Read Also: Top things to do in the Smoky Mountains for free

Can you swim in Douglas Lake?

Swimming in Douglas Lake is popular just about anywhere there’s a quiet spot.

Some people will swim in the reservoir’s open waters or coves. The many islands offer great spots to picnic and swim as well. 

If you’re looking for a more formal swimming venue, there is a public swim beach located on Douglas Dam Road at the Douglas Headwater and Tailwater Dam Reservation near Dandridge, about a 30 minute drive from Pigeon Forge. 

The water is dark and clarity is not great. Floatation devices are highly recommended for anyone swimming out on the open lake and for children swimming at any of the lake’s beaches or swimming holes. 

When I take my family to the lake, all the kids and their friends, even the competent swimmers, are required to wear a flotation device.

Allow me to also caution against swimming off of boats, docks or marinas. Two local boys suffered electric shock drowning (ESD) a few years ago.

There was a subsequent push to raise awareness and change some state laws to make marinas and docks better regulated. 

Still, it is not safe to go into the water near electricity. Click here for more information.

Is there a campground near Douglas Lake?

The Douglas Dam Headwater Campground is located at the spot with 60 campsites, four of which are primitive tent sites.

The campground features three bath houses, a boat ramp and a picnic area as well as a hiking trail that offers a look at some of the leftover artifacts from the construction of the dam. 

Another popular camping option is the Griffin Island Campground, a privately owned 14-acre island which offers camper rentals for those looking to get away. There’s no cable, internet or Wi-Fi on the island. Prices vary on several factors. 

The sun sets on Douglas Lake in East Tennessee (stock photo)

Boating and water sports on Douglas Lake

If you’re looking to get out on the lake, there are multiple ramps available. Consult the TVA website for the ones nearest you.

Gator Point and Mountain Cove Marina are both located in Sevier County. 

There are also multiple places where you can rent a pontoon, fishing boat or a jet ski if you don’t feel like hauling a trailer down to the mountains. 

Or, of course, if you do not own one.

Why is Douglas Lake green?

The water of Douglas Lake has a green tinge, due to relatively high levels of chlorophyll, but gets clearer the closer you get to the dam. 

Is it safe to swim in Douglas Lake?

Relatively, yes. 

Any body of water comes with some inherent dangers.

The lake isn’t prone to heavy currents and visibility above the water is good. It is important to note that the TVA lakes, especially when low, can hide large trees and other debris just under the surface.

At summertime, on Douglas Reservoir, you’re less likely to run into something. But if the water level is low, you should proceed with caution. 

You can get an idea for the water level by the edges of the lake and how much dirt is exposed,

If you question safety from an environmental standpoint, again, mostly yes. Don’t drink the reservoir water, of course.

But otherwise it is well within the acceptable levels for human interaction. 

The lake is in a rural area and after heavy rainstorms that follow a long dry spell, the lake’s E. coli levels will rise due to the runoff from area farms.

In that specific condition, you might not want to get in the water immediately downstream of a cow pasture or pig farm.

This is usually a very small threat that quickly and naturally repairs itself. 

Millions of people safely enjoy the TVA lake system each year.  There’s no reason you and your family can’t be among them.

What are your tips for going to Douglas Lake? Let us know in the comments!

Disclaimer: While we do our best to bring you the most up-to-date information, attractions or prices mentioned in this article may vary by season and are subject to change. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any mentioned business, and have not been reviewed or endorsed these entities. Contact us at info@thesmokies.com for questions or comments.

Previous

Meet the early authors of the Smoky Mountains: Mary Noailles Murfree

Cades Cove secrets: Top 5 hidden gems in the Smoky Mountains

Next

7 thoughts on “Douglas Lake: Fish, swim, boat only a few miles from Gatlinburg TN”

  1. I would love to visit Lake Douglas in the future! My husband talks of possibly moving to this area in the future and I’d love to explore beforehand. Any info you csn send me would be great.
    Thanks so much!

  2. I hope that all the restrooms open back up this year. Like the one above the Dam, look out area.

  3. We purchased a house on Douglas Lake in 2004 to retire in. The lake is great! Retiring before the end of the year so living there year round will be different. Vacations have been fun. The whole family and extended family love it. I just wish the lake wasn’t dropped so fast around Labor Day. That’s the sad part. Plenty to do during the summer.

  4. We really don’t need anymore people moving up here,all the construction going on here is changing country life to city life.
    Lakes are getting so crowded people that live here can’t even enjoy them

  5. Love Douglas Lake, (not packed ever) exploring the coves, SUP, Pontoon, Jet Ski- Float rafts whatever – all fun coupled with the more laid back lifestyle. Kept visiting and finally bought a parcel right on the lake 5 years ago. Hope to build next year….. Heart will always be in Chicago, my mission has been in SE Wisconsin but am transitioning to Jefferson County and so looking forward to it! Look forward to a few more pull up by boat and walk in places for great cheese burgers, ribs, or chef’s specials that always go great with local conversations and kicked back story tellin.

Leave a Comment