Dollywood History: A look back at Rebel Railroad, Goldrush Junction

The Dollywood we know and love today has roots going back to the early 1960s (photo by Michael Gordan / Shutterstock.com)

The Dollywood we know and love today has roots going back to the early 1960s (photo by Michael Gordan / Shutterstock.com)

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It’s taken nearly 60 years of growth for Dollywood to become the elite, award-winning, industry-leading example of theme park excellence it is today.

In fact, looking back to 1961, it’s almost hard to comprehend the evolution that’s taken place.

A vintage postcard from Rebel Railroad (archive photo circa 1960)
A vintage postcard from Rebel Railroad (archive photo circa 1960)

The 1960s theme park known as Rebel Railroad

Dolly Parton was just 15 years old when a pair of enterprising brothers from Blowing Rock, North Carolina, looked to double down on their railroad related mountain tourism business.

Modeled after Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock, the riders were protected by Confederate soldiers – convincingly played by local actors sweating it out in heavy wool uniforms.

The park also featured a blacksmith shop, a saloon and a general store.

Rebel Railroad continued through mid-1960s when it would undergo what would be the first of many transformations to come.

Read More: Dollywood train history: Meet the attraction that pre-dates the park

A vintage postcard from Goldrush Junction (archive photo circa 1970)
A vintage postcard from Goldrush Junction (archive photo circa 1970)

Rebel Railroad changes its name to Goldrush Junction

There is inconsistent reporting on when Rebel Railroad changed its name to Goldrush Junction.

Some reports indicate it was in the mid-60s while others point to 1970, when the park was purchased by Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell.

It would make sense for Modell who was seen as a progressive NFL owner to have been the one to change the name.

Under Modell’s ownership, the park added a log flume ride, an outdoor theater and the Robert F. Thomas Church.

Read Also: Dollywood’s chapel: How a real church ended up inside a theme park

According to Dollywood, in 1973, it cost less than $35,000 to build the Robert F. Thomas Chapel (photo contributed by Richard Melton)
According to Dollywood, in 1973, it cost less than $35,000 to build the Robert F. Thomas Chapel (photo contributed by Richard Melton)

Goldrush Junction turns into SIlver Dollar City in 1976

Modell’s tenure wasn’t long. The park sold again in 1976, was briefly named Goldrush for a season before being rechristened Silver Dollar City, making it a sister park to the new owners’ park in Branson, Mo.

Under the 10-year solo ownership of Jack and Pete Herschend, the park grew substantially.

Read Also: Uncovered Silver Dollar City photos offer rare look at pre-Dollywood days

The Log Flume at Silver Dollar City
The Log Flume at Silver Dollar City eventually became part of Dollywood, but no longer exists today (photo contributed by Richard Melton)

Dolly saves the day in 1986

In 1986, Dolly Parton got on board. Queue the harps and angel choir.

Dolly’s arrival gave the park an immediate boost of national recognition. It’s hard to overstate just how omnipotent Dolly was to the culture in the early 80s. But nobody thought of her as the next Walt Disney.

The Hubris. The Gall. Dollywood? Is she for real? Friends, she was.

Driven by the desire to help her hometown grow, Dolly led the way for an unprecedented expansion that surpassed anything imagined outside of Orlando.

Over the next 30 years Dolly’s imprint on the park itself, as well as the amusement park industry, is undeniable.

Her presence serves as a giant umbrella, looming over park management and her continued partners in the Herschend Family.

So ubiquitous is her presence that many, including my wife, operate as if Dolly herself is leading boardroom meetings, hand-selecting rides and approving day-to-day operations.

I swear my wife thinks of Dolly as if she’s Santa Claus and the rest of Dollywood is operated by hard-working, successful amusement park elves.

But while Dollywood’s success is driven by the people who work mostly behind the scenes, make no mistake it was Dolly’s arrival, name recognition and continued cachet that allowed the park to thrive.

Read More: Dollywood rides ranked: 10 best coasters and rides in the park

Nods to the park's past can still be found throughout Dollywood, like this Silver Dollar City sign on the Blazing Fury coaster (photo by Morgan Overholt/TheSmokies.com)
Nods to the park’s past can still be found throughout Dollywood, like this Silver Dollar City sign on the Blazing Fury coaster (photo by Morgan Overholt/TheSmokies.com)

What was Dollywood like in the early days?

Dollywood’s creation coincided with my first-ever trip to Sevier County in the mid-80s.

Then a young Hoosier, I followed the traditional Indiana Rite of Summer with a vacation to the Smokies.

Long ago, it was carved into stone tablets that East Tennesseans vacation at Myrtle Beach and Hoosiers vacation in the Great Smoky Mountains. Ever will it be so.

At the time, I had no idea I’d be moving to East Tennessee in a couple of years.

My memories of that trip are vague. My teenage memories, as teenage memories often do, betray me. I wasn’t as impressed as I should have been. I thought the park was (put down your pitchforks) a tad boring.

Still a northerner at heart, I decried Dollywood as inferior to Six Flags, King’s Island and the holiest of holies, Cedar Point.

Over the years, I matured and embraced my East Tennessee home.

Dollywood grew more charming and, as it presented an excellent opportunity to flirt with tourist girls, a trip to Dollywood became less of a chore.

Read More: Dollywood insider’s guide: 9 tips and tricks to know before you go

Today, Dolly is not only known as a country-music super star, but also a philanthropist who has transformed the lives of residents in her hometown of Sevier County and all over the world (photo by John Gullion/TheSmokies.com)
Today, Dolly is not only known as a country-music super star, but also a philanthropist who has transformed the lives of residents in her hometown of Sevier County and all over the world (photo by John Gullion/TheSmokies.com)

Dollywood’s impact on Sevier County

There was something else going on, akin to a snowball rolling down a hill.

Dolly’s powerful presence led to successes. Those successes led to more money. More money led to more investment in the park. More investment in the park led to more success and, without it being immediately obvious, Dollywood became a titan.

The rides got bigger and better. New roller coasters started popping up nearly annually and new sections of the park began opening and growing every year or two.

By the time Wildwood Grove opened just over a year ago in 2019, Dollywood was completely transformed into the image of its namesake.

From rides, to annual festivals and events, if you go to Dollywood and don’t have a good time, it’s entirely your fault – or possibly the fault of your hot and whiny kids.

Read More: How Dollywood’s unique Wildwood Grove expansion sets itself apart

Now Dollywood collects Golden Ticket awards like Charlie Bucket and Uncle Joe and Dolly really looks like the bright, blonde and brilliant successor to Walt Disney.

There’s a waterpark, a massive resort hotel and hints for expansion all over the horizon.

Dollywood, like its namesake, is an amazing American success story.

Disclaimer: While we do our best to bring you the most up-to-date information, attractions or prices mentioned in this article may vary by season and are subject to change. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any mentioned business, and have not been reviewed or endorsed these entities. Contact us at info@thesmokies.com for questions or comments.

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1 thought on “Dollywood History: A look back at Rebel Railroad, Goldrush Junction”

  1. I stopped at Dollywood in 1987 with my almost 3 yr old daughter & my Mom (around 60) on way back from visiting my CW friends John & Dee Taylor in FL. Enjoyed the park & panning for gold, couple kids rides & one show before having to leave. Time to visit again before my daughter gets any older. We will definitely ride more scary rides & enjoy more if the shows..maybe Christmas time when we meet somewhere between IL & FL. Can’t wait to see the park 30 yrs later

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